KOMARNO

Komárno/ Komárom was a historical town in Hungary situated on both banks of the Danube. Following World War I the newly created Czechoslovakia cut the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elisabeth Bridge which used to be a border crossing between Slovakia and Hungary until border checks were lifted according to the Schengen Area agreement of the EU.


The majority of the historical and cultural sites, including the town center of the former Komárno, were well preserved and remain to this day. The county and town halls, the courthouse, St. Andrews Church, the Danube Museum, and other buildings are examples of some of the many historical structures still standing today. Klapka Square (named after György Klapka, the Hungarian general who defended Komárno against the Austrians in the War of Independence) and the well preserved remains of the fortification structure are Komárno's main historical monuments symbolizing both the pride and resilience of this historical important town. The fortification structure includes Old and New fortresses at the confluence of the rivers Danube and Váh and the bastions from the Palatine's line to protect the city from west and the bastions of the Váh's line to protect the river banks of Váh. Komárno and Komárom were one city during the Austria-Hungary era. There are three additional fortresses on the Hungarian bank of the Danube river, i.e., Star (Hungarian: Csilag), Igmand and Monostor. Europe Square in the center represent buildings from all parts of Europe. The buildings function as shops and restaurants.

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